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**Rough notes of what I shared during breakout session at #iHAV2017 Conference on 27 July 2017**
iHAV Conference: Breakout session on Small Actions, Big Difference
What do Teshie Nungua & Ikorodu roads in Accra & Lagos have in common? Answer: Traffic. And what causes traffic on these routes? One major cause is the practice of people crossing the roads indiscriminately, at many points. Cars stopping for a couple of seconds for pedestrians to cross compound over many cars and leads to traffic. Small actions compounding to make big differences.

“Small actions, big difference” – Unilever slogan. We say little drops of water make a mighty ocean. Same with actions.

Think Big, Start Small, Move Fast 

I came away from my visit to Dr Wereko-Brobby aka Tarzan with one main lesson: Engineers do, they are doers. They are solution providers. After the talk must always come the options and then prioritise to implement.

The Radio Eye example. Just start.

How to start? You can only start by starting. The first time anyone did anything, he did it as an amateur. 

Start simple, get fancy later.

iHAV poster and the focus on implementation. 

We tend to talk too much and do little.

We tend to focus on analysis to paralysis.

Today’s post on church fund-raising and community service

Facebook & DGG & Apagya- 22k ghs 

Community projects – Nsawam, Wa, Volta school

Reading clinics 

Economic growth – all around us

Solution leads to income
The educated African seems only to be conditioned for steady state conditions, to feel comfortable only when conditions are certain and all risks have been fully analysed and covered.
The educated African is the most afraid to take risks on his dreams.
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Reading from an earlier Nsempiisms
Earlier this year, my friend Abena Krobea shared a video about a young Malawian inventor called William Kamkwamba. In the video, the young man recounted how famine was ravaging his country in the early 2000s and how he had to drop out of secondary school. Determined to still educate himself, he decided to frequently visit the library of his former school and to read books, especially science books. From one of those books, he learnt about windmills, and decided to build one himself. Not having the requisite materials, he visited scrap yards around his house and salvaged bits and bits including bicycle parts, and PVC pipes, and built his first wind mills that powdered his house with electricity and also pumped water for irrigation. Awesome stuff! Inspirational!
In this TED talk by William, he made a profound statement: “I tried it. And I made it.” He made a move with his ideas, he took a risk on his dreams.
When I watched the video and as I personally tango with the many ideas I have that I haven’t tried, knowing what I to do and yet not doing it, procrastinating, thinking of how to do it perfectly, yet holding back and worrying about the passage of time, giving me a headache, I looked at William and I am provoked to take the pill of action and welcome my relief.
But it is not that easy and that is when I decided to write to you and share my reflections.
At a book reading at Rennie’s Garden, Dr Ruby Goka told us that one of the worse things about being a doctor or a medical student is that when one got ill, he or she only imagines the worst of possible illnesses. 
Same with the educated African. The educated African seems only to be conditioned for steady state conditions, to feel comfortable only when conditions are certain and all risks have been fully analysed and covered.
The educated African is the most afraid to take risks on his dreams.
Not so with many entrepreneurs who need to take a plunge into uncertain waters. Not so with William, who tried it and made it.

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